February 10, 2000

The Centre for Cross Border Studies is looking for Research Projects

Press release 14 December 1999

The Centre for Cross Border Studies has been set up to research and develop cooperation across the Irish border in education, business, public administration, communications and a range of other practical areas.

The Centre is looking for experienced researchers to carry out 9-12 month research projects, to begin in February-March 2000. The projects will investigate the state of cross-border cooperation in the chosen subject areas; identify and analyse gaps in present cooperation and barriers to improved cooperation; and formulate detailed proposals on how future cooperation might be upgraded and made more effective.

In the first instance, the research proposals should be in the following broad areas:

  • HEALTH SERVICES (including public health)
  • EDUCATION (including lifelong learning)
  • TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS (including Information and Communications Technology)
  • PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (including local government)

In making their proposals, researchers should detail consultations they have had with policy-makers and senior practitioners in their chosen field, and explain the significance of their proposals for cross-border cooperation in the light of these consultations. The research should include provision for further, structured consultation with such expert groups. Research grants will be in the region of Stg£10,000-£25,000.

The Centre will expect researchers to begin work by 1st March 2000, and will require a final report by 28th February 2001. Researchers will be expected to make presentations to conferences and seminars.

Requests for further information should be sent, before 12th January 2000, to the Director, Centre for Cross Border Studies, 39 Abbey Street, Armagh BT61 7EB

Tel. 01861-511550 Fax. 01861-511721 E-mail: a.pollak@qub.ac.uk

Closing date for return of proposals: Friday, 21st January 2000.

The Centre for Cross Border Studies is sponsored by the EU Special Support Programme for Peace and Reconciliation.

Back